Schools, churches boost funds by collecting many tons of waste paper

 

Ronnie Recycler is the cartoon-like character that visits schools to help learners understand the benefits of recycling and to encourage them to collect waste paper and cardboard.

Collecting waste paper and cardboard is much more than a good habit and a way of keeping our environment clean. It is also the way that many enterprising people earn money. The recycling industry in South Africa already provides jobs for 100 000 people.

Transformation into essential activity sustains thousands of jobs.

Recycling has been transformed in the consumer’s eyes from a worthy environmentally-focused activity into a fully-fledged business sector that provides jobs for thousands and contributes significantly to the economy every year.

How recycling boosts growth in jobs and factories

Recycling has been transformed from a worthy environmentally-focused activity into a fully-fledged business sector that provides jobs for thousands and generates billions for the economy every year.

Now’s the time to get into recycling, says Mpact

Recycling is just about the only way we know to turn something seemingly worth nothing into something of substantial value in terms of jobs, economic growth and, of course, the environment.

Mpact Recycling, in partnership with Trudon (the publishers of the Yellow Pages), have opened entries to the annual telephone directory and paper drive school competition.

All success stories begin with a little bit of help. But access to financial help, equipment, business training and industry knowledge are often major stumbling blocks for small business initiatives.

With a 45% share of the South African paper recycling market, and collecting in excess of 460 000 tons of recovered paper a year, John Hunt, MD of Mpact Recycling, believes the division is well-placed to meet the increasing demand for recycled fibre.