South Africa’s National Waste Management Strategy (NWMS) aims to see all South African households in the country’s major centres separating household waste by 2016. As the nation gears up for this year’s Clean-up Week, 14 – 20 September, and Recycle Day, 18 September, Mpact Recycling challenges all South Africans to play their part in keeping the country clean 365 days a year. It’s never been easier getting into the routine of recycling.

Statistics SA reported that the first quarter of 2015 saw unemployment rates reach a 12 year high in South Africa. John Hunt, managing director of Mpact Recycling, indicates that this poses a challenge for industry to become more innovative and agile in creating opportunities that contribute to long-term and sustainable employment. A case in point is the recycling industry which has become a significant growth enabler in the face of hard times.

Every year, thousands of tons of waste matter are generated through traditional festive season activities. With water shortages wreaking havoc around the country and road travel increasing carbon emissions, it’s the perfect time to adjust the way we use our precious resources. Mpact Recycling offers a few tips on how to do this.

Mpact Recycling has awarded a total of R140 000 in prizes to 34 schools around the country in their Ronnie Recycler Schools Competition prize giving. Nursery, primary and high schools registered with Mpact Recycling in Gauteng, Pretoria, Durban, Richards Bay and Cape Town were given the opportunity to compete.

Mpact Recycling has opened entries to their annual Ronnie Recycler schools competition. Nursery, primary and high schools registered with Mpact Recycling in Johannesburg, Springs, Pretoria, Midrand, Durban, Richards Bay and Cape Town can win their share of R140 000 in prize money just for helping their school to recycle.

South Africa’s National Waste Management Strategy (NWMS) aims to see all South African households in the country’s major centres separating household waste by 2016. However, a survey conducted by the CSIR has indicated that most South African households do not know how or what to recycle, or where to dispose of their household recyclables.

Mpact Recycling’s schools paper pick-up programme, which allows schools to raise funds while educating young learners on the importance of recycling and in turn environmental awareness, is gaining momentum in several of South Africa’s main centres.

Disposal of waste into landfills is generally regarded as a last resort in the management of waste in our country today, particularly since as much as a quarter of all the municipal waste generated in South Africa today still comprises mainline recyclables such as glass, paper, tins and plastics.

Mpact Recycling’s popular kerbside paper collection initiative is active in more than 200,000 homes in designated areas within Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni and Tshwane, effectively collecting unwanted magazines, newspapers, cardboard and paper products (cereal boxes, soap boxes and printed paper) directly from people’s homes for recycling into other useful products.

South Africa’s National Waste Management Strategy aims to see all South African households in the country’s major centres separating household waste by 2016, but the reality is that most South African households do not know how or what to recycle, nor do they know where to dispose of their household recyclables.